Variations of Body Temperature

A body temperature of 37°C (98.6°F) is considered normal. If the body temperature rises there is a risk of developing heat exhaustion/stroke. While at the other end of the scale if the body temperature drops too much then Hypothermia can develop. Both conditions can be fatal if not treated successfully
Heat Exhaustion

Definition: Heat exhaustion is an acute heat problem, above 100.4°F (38°C), caused by dehydration. It occurs when the body no longer can dissipate heat effectively because of hot environmental conditions or increased body heat production. It may progress to heatstroke, above 104°F (40°C), when the body's heat regulating mechanism becomes overwhelmed and fail.

Heat exhaustion
Heatstroke
Febrile Convulsions

Febrile convulsions occur when a child has a high temperature. The convulsions occur because the electrical systems in the brain have not yet matured sufficiently to cope with the stress of a high temperature. Most occur with common illnesses such as ear infections, coughs, colds, flu, and other virus infections. The use of liquid Paracetamol will help reduce the temperature.

General Management + see under for particular condition

GO DR SHAVPU ACBC 

Secondary Survey

ASHICE (Consider)

Transport to Hospital

Professional Handover

Heat Exhaustion - Move patient to cooler environment, Place patient at rest, Give cool drinks, Sponge with luke warm water

Heat Stroke - Remove as much clothing as possible, Wrap in a wet sheet, Fanning the patient, Cool packs around neck and under arms, treat accordingly if unconscious

Febrile Convulsions - Remove clothing and sponging with luke warm water if child has a fever, reassure the parents as it can be frightening for them.

Hypothermia

Definition: is a medical condition in which the patients core body temperature has dropped below normal and normal metabolism begins to be impaired. This begins to occur when the core temperature drops below 35 degrees Celsius (95 degrees Fahrenheit). If body temperature falls below 32 degrees Celsius (90 degrees Fahrenheit), the condition can become critical and eventually fatal. Body temperatures below 27 C (80 F) are almost uniformly fatal.

The body loses heat through:
Signs and Symptoms

Never assume someone has died, as at low temperatures the body can survive very much longer than at normal temperatures.

Management of Hypothermia

GO DR SHAVPU ACBC 

Take temperature, Remove wet clothing, Cover patient with blanket, Monitor ECG, Warm drink if patient is conscious, Reassurance, Oxygen, Make patient comfortable, a patient with hypothermia could be at risk of cardiac arrest. Do not apply external heat, especially to the arms and legs, as this can force cold blood back toward the heart, lungs and brain, causing the core body temperature to drop and induce cardiac arrest

Secondary Survey

ASHICE (Consider)

Transport to Hospital

Professional Handover

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